Monthly Archives: April 2013

Ubuntu 13.04 is released!

Ubuntu 13.04 has been officially released today. I’ve been testing it on and off for a while with many of the Beta releases. I’ve not had any issues with it, in fact, I’ve had less issues with 13.04 than with the 12.10 release. (Mainly issues with installing Nvidia drivers) There are some known issues with it at the moment which may cause some issues for some people:

Warning: according to the known issues in the release log [0]:

  • Skype won’t start (without a fix [1])

  • Google Chrome won’t install (without a fix [2])

[0] https://wiki.ubuntu.com/RaringRingtail/ReleaseNotes

[1] https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/skype/+bug/1155327

[2] https://code.google.com/p/chromium/issues/detail?id=226002#c…

I don’t use Skype, and I usually use Chromium when I’m using Linux and it’s easy to install from the software center. The fine folks at OMGUbuntu have some good videos up on the changes with the desktop interface since 12.10. Overall, download it and check it out, Ubuntu keeps getting better with each release.

Download: http://releases.ubuntu.com/raring/

Info from OMG Ubuntu: http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2013/04/ubuntu-13-04-download

 

 

 

Intel Profits down 25%. Mark Hachman says “What me worry?”

As Intel reported quarterly profits down 25% year over year, [Mark Hachman at ReadWriteWeb](http://readwrite.com/2013/04/18/intels-secret-to-success-manufacturing#feed=/enterprise) doesn’t think it’s a big deal because of Moore’s law. He believes that Intel’s die shrink to 22nm will help them bring the x86 architecture to compete with the ARM dominance in the mobile field. And of course, Intel has always been able to increase performance with each CPU generation. I don’t share his optimism.

One of the key benefits of having an ARM license is the ability to design a chip to your own specifications for a particular device. Combining that with someone like Apple who controls the entire software stack, and you can see how beneficial this capability is. With Intel, you are beholden to their timeline on processors, and you have to hope that they will design it with features that you need. Not everyone who licenses ARM technology has this type of license, but Apple and Samsung do, and guess who are on top of the mobile game?

EDIT-added link to ReadWriteWeb.

Malware Bytes screws up thousand’s of PC’s with a bad update.

File this under oops. An update to Malware Bytes security software marked some essential Windows system files as malware which would then cause the PC to be unable to boot. They have since disabled pulled the update from their servers. It seems on some computers the software flagged itself as bad! If you have been affected, you can try go over to their forums where a user has posted a guide on how to rescue your system if it can’t boot.

[MalwareBytes Forums:](http://forums.malwarebytes.org/index.php?showtopic=125136&st=0&p=669358&#entry669358)

Note, except for this really big issue, Malware Bytes does work well on computers that are spyware infected.

The Verge reviews the HTC First and Facebook Home.

This is what the The Verge excels at, video reviews. They are well made and with just enough detail to cover most everything. There are people who complain that the reviews aren’t technical enough, but that’s why we have Anandtech.

I like the hardware for the new HTC First phone. The size looks good, easy enough to use in one hand, and a decent 720p screen. It looks like you can disable most of the Facebook Home overlay if you want, and run basically stock Android. Although the reviewer calls the hardware “midrange”, the CPU is really good and 1GB of RAM is perfectly acceptable for a decent Android experience. Most of these reviewers live in bubbles being exposed to the best of the best and become a bit jaded when dealing with something less than top notch.


Regarding the Facebook Home experience, I am impressed with the visuals. Dieter from The Verge knocks it for dumbing down the Android Experience, but for it’s intended audience, it’s spot on. Remember, Facebook wants you to use their interface as much as possible, and to leave it for Android as little as possible. I would imagine as Facebook updates the app, more and more of it will be replacing the stock Android with Facebook Home replacements. As Matt Drance from TUAW wrote, this could be a test run for a complete overhaul of Android with Facebook home Front and Center. I wished that HTC and Facebook could work out a deal similar to the Nexus phone series to sell this phone contract free at a reasonable price, ($250-300) I could see myself picking one up at that price. It’s not worth signing another contract with ATT to me.